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2019 Impact Report

In 2019, Springboard Trust continued to improve outcomes for students, principals and schools across New Zealand. Reaching a record 154,212 learners nationwide, our portfolio of programmes, workshops and services supported more than 400 principals in improving their educational leadership.   In this Portfolio Impact Report, you will find:   A breakdown of our portfolio by region and programme.  Qualitative and quantitative analysis of our impact on New Zealand school leaders and students.   Analysis of our volunteers' work and impact. We have gone further than ever before in the evaluation of our impact on students in NZ schools, and are thrilled with the results - we hope you are too. 

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COVID-19 Distance Learning Support for Principals

Distance learning is here, and it may be here for the long-term.   The challenge for school leaders is now finding what works well for their school community, how to build confidence in the use of distance learning methods, and what can be sustained in the long-term.  Springboard and our expert partners are providing support to schools under Ministry of Education’s guidelines, leading and implementing the transition from classroom to a remote and blended environment where every student, teacher, parent and caregiver will have a different role to play.  How Springboard Trust can help with distance learning  Under our School Innovation Services banner, and in our role as an accredited PLD provider with the Ministry of Education, Springboard can support you and your school to create a sustainable distance learning model that brings together your people, all relevant technology and best-practice leadership.    Currently, we have developed custom support under the following themes:   Leadership in a time of change (lifting capability, critical decision-making)  Leading towards distance learning Implementing distance learning (“getting it done”, including distance teaching practices)  Engaging stakeholders  Building resilience  Coaching for school leaders  If you, your school or your community need assistance with making distance learning a seamless experience for everyone involved, please get in touch with your Programme Manager or fill out our contact form.    Who can access Springboard’s distance learning support – and how  Our support comes in addition to the COVID-19 PLD Distance Learning Support package from the MoE, and is open to all schools who need it – not just Springboard alumni. To access our support, you can either reallocate approved PLD hours you have with Springboard Trust or request our support directly from the Ministry of Education.   To access Ministry of Education guidance, FAQs and contact details on Distance Learning PLD, head this way!

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News, case studies and more

News

Springboard's guide to Zoom: The basics

Springboard Trust’s programmes are built on connection. Principals partner with volunteers, each bringing their unique insight and perspective to a relationship that builds stronger leaders.   But in the current environment, that connection is harder to build. We are all in our bubbles, and face-to-face connection is extremely limited.   We have tools to overcome this as best we can – and one of the most reliable we’ve used so far has been Zoom. Today, we’ll walk you through how – and when – we're using it.   What is Zoom?   Zoom is a cloud-based video conferencing app, that anyone can pick up and use. You can use it in your browser (like Google Chrome or Edge), or download the app and use it from your desktop. The National Cyber Security Centre recommends using the desktop application, then the in-browser version, with the Zoom mobile app to be avoided wherever possible.  Additionally, it's important to make sure you always update the app as soon as one becomes available - this keeps you up to date with the latest security patches and tweaks. When Springboard Trust is using Zoom   As an organisation, we have replaced all face-to-face communications with video conferencing. For smaller meetings – say, fewer than five people – we often use Microsoft Teams.   But with Zoom, you get a much more comprehensive view for bigger calls. When there are five or more people on a call, Zoom has a useful ‘gallery view’ that turns everyone into the Brady Bunch titles, rather than you only being able to see the person who is speaking.   So as a rule of thumb, we use Zoom when we have six or more people on a call. Typically, our team does one of two things in Zoom: they set up and schedule a meeting for others, or they join a meeting that someone else has set up.  How to use Zoom in the workplace  Zoom has their own very useful guides for setting up and running meetings – we are going to run you through an adaptation of our own guidelines as well.   Setting up Zoom   You don’t have to have a Zoom account to join a meeting – the host (person who created the meeting) can send you a link that you can click regardless.   But if you want to host your own, setting up an account is a good idea. Simply go to Zoom.us, and click the Sign Up button. It’s free, but if you use a paid account, you get access to hosting meetings longer than 40 minutes with more than two people. It’ll also be much easier to set your own meetings up if you have an account.   Go through the steps, and you have it! You’ll also be given the opportunity to download the app – not essential, but handy (and preferred by the GCSB).   2. Setting up and scheduling a meeting in Zoom Depending on whether you’re in the app or the browser, you’ll have a button saying ‘Schedule a meeting’. Clicking this takes you to a screen where you can fill out all of your meeting’s details.  Many of these are straightforward – the time, name and video or audio settings in particular. However, some of the settings might not be familiar to you.   ‘Enable join before host’ is something the GCSB recommends keeping off (do not tick).  ‘Mute participants upon entry’ is good practice, to avoid sudden loud noises on the call   ‘Enable waiting room’ is a useful security measure and, as of April 9th, turned on by default for individual accounts  ‘Record the meeting automatically’ is useful if you want to review the call later on Please note that in early April, Zoom made several important changes to its security, notably automatically be turning on meeting passwords and waiting rooms for individual accounts. There is also a new security button available in-call. You can read more about the latest updates to settings here.  3. Inviting people to a Zoom meeting   Once you have scheduled a Zoom meeting, it will show up in the ‘Meetings’ tab of your Zoom account. You can change the time and settings from there.   Additionally, you can add it to one of your existing calendars – Google, Outlook or Yahoo. Just click one of the buttons to add it, and you’ll be taken to the relevant calendar with everything set up for you!   From here, you can add invitees and a personalised message for the meeting. People will be sent the calendar invite, which contains a link to the meeting and all the details you want them to know.   Alternatively, there is a section to ‘copy the invitation’ - this gives you a URL that you can put in your own calendar event, or just include in an email or chat to someone you want to meet with.   When it’s time for the meeting, you have the option to click ‘Start Meeting’, or just click the link in your event! Only can the host can start the meeting if you have that setting turned on, as long as you have ‘enable join before host’ turned off – which is a good idea!   4. What to expect when you're in a Zoom meeting   When you enter a Zoom meeting, it should look like this (except you'll see yourself and others instead of a stock photo of a bunny): You’ll be asked what kind of audio to use – just select ‘Use Computer Audio’. Then you should be able to hear everyone!   The next step is checking everyone can see and hear you. In the bottom left are the ‘Mute’ and ‘Start Video’ buttons – click these to turn your audio and video respectively off and on.   In the middle are a few buttons:   Invite is to bring other people onto the call – you can do this by entering their email   Manage participants is a button for the call host to mute or manage everyone on the call   Share is for screen sharing – you will get to select a tab or screen that you want to share with everybody else.  Chat brings up a text window on the right, where everyone can do a text chat – useful to keep people from talking over one another. You can chat with everyone, or a specific individual. Record is a host-specific button, to turn this on and off as required. - able to be given to others    Breakout rooms is a button for hosts, where they can set up multiple 'rooms' and assign people on the call to them. This is useful for more close-knit sessions within a larger workshop. Security is a button for hosts that lets them lock the meeting (preventing new people from entering), and adjust other security settings for participants. And that is the basics of being on a Zoom call! We’ll be back soon with some more advanced Zoom tricks, like running whiteboards and breakout rooms – as well as some best-practice data security from the NZ Cyber Security Centre and GCSB.   In the meantime, if you have further questions or need some guidance on using Zoom, please get in touch with the Springboard team. We are well-versed in these tools and are happy to assist you or your leadership team with getting up to speed.  
4 min read
News

The government's learning from home package: A summary

The government has announced a broad-ranging $88.7 million package to support families and schools as we head back into term two with the lockdown still in place.   From broadcast content to device distribution, Education Minister Chris Hipkins has emphasised the Ministry’s focus on public health, while still supporting New Zealand’s learners. We at Springboard are thrilled to see this investment, and look forward to working with school leaders in any way we can. With a goal of every NZ household having access to at least one learning channel from home by mid-April, there is a lot to be rolled out in a short space of time – here is what the package entails.  More information: Learning From Home government website Minister Chris Hipkins' press release Hon Kelvin Davis'press release 1. Increased access to internet and devices  Minister Hipkins noted in a press conference on April 8 that some 80,000 New Zealand households (and therefore more than 100,000 children) are without access to either internet or appropriate devices for learning (ie laptops).  To address this, the government is working with a number of businesses and suppliers to provide connectivity and / or devices to these households. They have at least 17,000 laptops sourced already and are working with schools to safely free up devices they might have on-premises already.   While he notes that they will not be able to resolve issues for all households on day one of the school term, there will be two key priorities: secondary students with looming NCEA assessments, and households with the greatest need.   Hipkins acknowledges that there are large challenges with so many households in need, and that there are hundreds for whom internet is a technical impossibility, but is optimistic that everyone will have access to the learning they need.   2. Hard packs of learning materials   To supplement the expansion of devices and connectivity, the government is putting together some half a million ‘hard packs’ to be distributed to families across New Zealand.   These packs contain materials to support and supplement each child’s learning, with different packs going to learners of different ages.   For example, a senior primary school pack contains workbooks from Te Kura, School Journal copies, activities for inside and outside, and all requisite health and safety materials. Junior primary packs contain items like numbers workbooks, fold-out card packs, and the ready-to-read series (Mr Hipkins was thrilled to see the Little Yellow Digger in one he showed the media).   Additionally, early learning / ECE packs would be split by age group and contain jigsaws, stories, pavement chalks, pens and crayons, fabric and coloured cardboard or drawing paper.   Each pack will contain extensive resources for parents, guiding them on how to use the resources and keep their children engaged.   Speaking before Mr Hipkins, Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern noted that providing these materials helps to take the pressure off parents, who have the added jobs of keeping their children entertained and engaged in learning during lockdown.  3. Television channels  The government is launching two television channels – one in English, and one in Māori – with up to 6.5 hours of educational broadcast content shown daily. The government is exploring Pasifika options currently, and the channels are being provided by TVNZ and Māori Television.   It will focus on different age groups at different times, and cover subjects like wellbeing, numeracy, literacy, music, movement, science and physical education. There will be a range of well-known New Zealand hosts, with Suzy Cato being the only one Mr Hipkins would confirm during the press conference.   4. Additional resources for parents and teachers  Mr Hipkins acknowledged the extensive work that parents are doing in the home under lockdown, and the challenges that a remote schooling environment would mean.   This is why the fourth arm of the government package includes resources for teaching communities, and parents who want to continue their involvement in a child’s learning. Examples include Ki te Ao Mārama, announced by Hon Kelvin Davis today, as well as the re-establishment of the Te Ara Whitīki helpdesk to support distance learning.   These measures will come into place from April 15th, and will be in place for one month. While Mr Hipkins noted they were planning around the initial four-week lockdown period, these measures are designed to be sustainable should level four be extended.   For more information, please refer to the Beehive website – and if your school requires any assistance setting up its remote learning environment, please get in touch with the Springboard team.  
4 min read
News

Working from home: 25 tips from the Springboard team

The COVID-19 pandemic has meant that for many people, they are working from home for a lengthy period for the very first time.   This can be a challenging situation, but it is one that Springboard Trust can assist with. Since we began offering programmes and workshops around the country, we have had team members in each of these regions to provide on-the-ground support.   We thought it would be a good idea to canvas them for their top tips on working remotely – here's what we came up with!1. Walk to punctuate your day  Before you start work and when you finish work, taking a quick 5-10 minute walk is a great way to punctuate the day, putting a nice ‘event’ between your working time and your relaxing time.   2. Make the environment feel like an office  Wherever you choose to work, try and make it feel like a working environment. Having a dedicated work desk, some storage for your paperwork, and a phone if you need it – try and make your working spot distinctly work-flavoured to keep those boundaries.   3. Get dressed for work (at least on the top half)  Pyjamas are comfy, but they won’t put you in a work mindset easily! While it’s important to dress work-appropriate for video calls, most of the time you’ll only need to take care of your top half. Warm slippers, comfortable socks and – should the occasion call for it – some polar fleece trackpants can all be perfect additions to a remote working wardrobe.  4. Use the environment to improve your Te Reo   A few of our team members are scrubbing up on their Te Reo, using resources from Te Wiki o te Reo Māori (like the essential Kōrero Kawhe sheet) to do so! A great way to improve your language skills, especially in your downtime.  5. Do your chores early  Once dressed, do the tasks around the house that need to be done – otherwise they become the perfect excuse to stop working later on!   6. Be predictable! Make a point of starting and stopping at the same time each day, with the same breaks in between. Personally, I like to work in 90-minute blocks, which let me get through a lot without feeling like I’m stuck in my chair.   I like to announce to my partner that I’m going to work – even if I’m just going to the next room to open my laptop!   7. Do a lunchtime activity  Exercise, walks, reading, watching an episode of RuPaul’s Drag Race – do something that isn’t work for your lunch break. You’re in the comfort of your own home, and working there shouldn’t diminish your enjoyment of that!  8. Make some interruption rules If you have children or family at home, be very clear and specific about your working time and the rules for interrupting – that stickman drawing might be a work of art, but it has to wait until you can pay proper attention to it!   This lets you dedicate real, proper quality time to both your work and your family.   9. The house doesn’t have to be perfect  While chores at the start of the day are a good idea, the house doesn’t have to be perfect before you start. With everyone living at home, there’s always going to be something that needs doing – but focus on having your workspace be comfortable rather than the house be spotless.  10. Make your start and end times clear to others Know when you start and when you finish. Your work-life boundaries are going to blur during this time, so give yourself a fighting chance of keeping them clear with a good timetable.   11. Change your space  You know better than anyone where you like to relax while you’re at home – so make your working space somewhere else. You don’t want to have the places where you relax, watch TV or sleep become spaces where you’re in a work mindset.   12. Do the same thing every morning  Shower, breakfast, brush your teeth, open laptop. Exercise, breakfast, check emails, read the news, do the laundry, start work at 9:30am. Whatever your comfortable routine in the morning, stick to it – do the same thing every morning. It’ll help keep a sense of healthy routine in your life.   13. Work in bursts  Some work best in 90 minute spurts as above, while others prefer the Pomodoro method, and others like to do a big morning session then a big afternoon session. Find the amount of time you can comfortably stay working for, and build your schedule around that.  15. Check off achievements  Be as pedantic as you want with listing tasks – the more you put in your list, the more you get to check off throughout the day!   16. Pack a lunch   I’ve already taken a two-hour lunch break to do some baking – preparing a lunch in the morning can help you keep the momentum on days you need it.  17. Allow yourself a bad day  This is going to be a difficult time, and for many people working from home is just not the ideal. Don’t be hard on yourself if it’s difficult to get work done.   18. Change the energy   Play with your dog! Make a cup of tea! Change the rhythm and energy of your day to keep things interesting.   19. Stand up, and standup  Standing up is an excellent way to energise a working environment – as are daily standups. The daily standup is a quick five minute meeting with your team to catch up on what you’re doing today, what you did yesterday and what your roadblocks are – it's great to get more face time too!   20. Vary your hours  Your work day does not have to be one continuous block of time. Take breaks when you need them, and be kind to yourself.21. Check people’s calendars  We might be working remotely, but people’s schedules will still be busy. Make sure to keep on top of your colleague’s calendars so you know when they’re free for a meeting – or for a social catch-up!   22. Make the most of phone calls  Video calls tend to have you sitting in one spot – but phone calls give you the freedom to get up and walk around. Schedule these in for your afternoon so you can be active, maintain connection and keep on top of your work!   23. Don’t eat at your desk!   Or you’ll soon be wondering just where all those snacks went!   24. Check your coffee intake  Chain coffee drinking is a deadly trap for remote workers. Line up your coffee drinking with your timetable, or get someone in the home to hide the black gold from you lest you drink it all in the first week of lockdown!   25. Be intentional with your social time  Without the natural interruptions and conversations that happen in an office, you have to be deliberate about making time to catch up with people in a casual, social manner. Be mindful of schedules, but be intentional about talking to people about their day!  
5 min read
Media Release

Springboard Trust response to COVID-19 pandemic

With the recent announcements of new precautions for managing COVID-19, Springboard Trust is actively reviewing its operations. We are currently monitoring developments and following the advice of the Ministries of Health and Education. We know you will at this point be concerned about your own schools and communities, and will want to prioritise that work. Our team is taking extra precautions and working with venues and organisers to ensure that our programmes do not impact on your communities. We remain committed to leadership development, and will continue to find innovative ways of providing safe and impactful learning. As a first step, we are moving all meetings, calls, programme and workshop delivery to an online environment. We will send Zoom links to all those who wish to join, and those impacted can expect further communications from us in the coming days and weeks. While community transmission of COVID is not a reality at the time of writing, our first and foremost priority is to create safe conditions for everyone. As a second step, the Springboard team and volunteers are all practicing safe distancing. We have reorganised our office to accommodate this, and have urged all team members to stay home if it is safer to do so. Our internal meetings are now conducted online, and our team has been advised to reschedule or reorganise all future meetings to accommodate this. This may mean we have to reschedule or delay parts of our programmes at short notice - it is our top priority to be careful and safe in the way we work. Finally, we have postponed some workshops and our ongoing recruitment - individuals affected can expect to hear from us soon. If you have any queries or concerns about the delivery of upcoming workshops, programmes or services you have with Springboard Trust, please contact your Programme Manager for more information. We have provided some useful links below, and please do not hesitate to get in touch. Helpful links and information regarding COVID-19 NZ Ministry of Health Guidelines for events and gatherings Guidelines for infectious disease prevention in the workplace Guidelines for workplace pandemic situations Guide to self-isolation Latest updates Latest media releases NZ Govt - other Information and advice for students, whānau and the education sector Information for businesses General information 'Flattening the curve' - The Spinoff 'Self-isolation guide' - The Guardian
2 min read
News

Teacher leadership: When paying it forward pays dividends

Leadership in New Zealand schools doesn’t rest solely with the principal.   By distributing leadership throughout a team, you clarify accountabilities, efficiently delegate workload, and give all of your people the opportunity to thrive. Typically, this distributed leadership begins with your senior leaders – DPs and APs and the like. But as recent research shows, teacher leadership is just as – if not more – critical for student success.   What is teacher leadership? Broadly speaking, teacher leadership is what it says it is – active teachers taking on more leadership roles within their school. As Charlotte Danielson explains, this is typically exhibited through a teacher’s sphere of influence expanding outside the classroom, as well as motivating and mobilising other individuals. It remains focused on the school’s ultimate vision and goals.   Additionally, Leblanc and Shelton (2012) found that collaboration is fundamental for teacher leaders, while time is the most important resource to make it happen.   This can mean that teacher leadership is a difficult concept to put into practice. With already long hours and staffing challenges for schools across New Zealand, a formalised programme to develop teachers into strong educational leaders can fall down the priority list.   But for those who can implement such a strategy, it can pay dividends in the long-term.  Distributing leadership all the way down  When school leadership is distributed, it can have a significant positive influence on student outcomes. However, some methods of spreading leadership throughout a school are more effective than others.   The above research – Seven Strong Claims Revisited - summarises a few key elements of successful distributed leadership:   Basing responsibilities on expertise, rather than role   Creation of new teams   Focus on interactions over actions Strong levels of leadership team cooperation and full participation in decision making  Of course, the degree to which schools can do this will vary in each case. Some may be able to flip the system, as Kneyber and Evers put it, resulting in a completely teacher-driven model for how the school is run. Others may simply use their strategic plan as a blueprint, and begin assigning initiatives and actions to teachers with the relevant expertise – giving them control and the opportunity to develop their own leadership skills.   The key is finding the balance between available resources, your teachers’ expertise, and the degree of change that your school can take on.  Why teacher leadership matters  If you don’t focus on developing teacher leadership, you may miss out on significant impact for students.   At Springboard Trust, we focus on school leadership - especially in our foundational courses like the Strategic Leadership for Principals Programme. As principals continue their learning journey through our Alumni Services and School Innovation Services, we focus more and more on the leadership team and empower them with tools and frameworks to lead on their own. It is vital that school leaders then impart this learning on their teachers. As Seven Strong Claims notes, in terms of in-school variables, educational leadership is second only to classroom teaching in impact on learners.   And while teachers must be given the resources and time to continue effective practice, developing teacher leadership brings a new dimension of growth into the fold. Harris and Jones (2019) note that teachers who play an active role in creating change yield much more positive results in their school than ones who are “passive tools of policy delivery”.   In the end, the message here is one of paying it forward. Teacher leadership will look different in every school context – but by empowering them to influence, collaborate and take responsibility, you can only deepen the pool of leadership in education and help learners succeed.
5 min read
News

15 thoughtful ways (plus an infographic) to help shout out your principal

This International Women’s Day, it’s time to shout out your principal!   New Zealand has 1,291 female principals – for the first time, there are more women than men in this role. Coupled with female teachers outnumbering men by nearly 3:1, it is clear that New Zealand’s women hold a massive collective responsibility for young people’s learning. At Springboard Trust, we work closely with principals right across New Zealand to improve their leadership for the good of all students. But unfortunately, we can’t work with every single principal – so we’re enlisting you all to help. Let’s be better together and shout out our principals!   But of course, teachers and principals are busy people. Shouting out someone without much time on their hands might be intrusive if you do it the wrong way.   Thankfully, we have 15 ways for you to shout out a principal for #IWD – we hope you find something that works for your local leader! Shout-outs that keep it personal  For many people, the concept of a public shout-out is absolutely mortifying. If you want to acknowledge the hard work of a principal for International Women’s Day in a more private setting, any of the below should do just fine!    1. A greeting card  The traditional. The stalwart. The classic. Cards are minimalist, non-intrusive, and let you say something personal and meaningful that a principal can appreciate in their own time!   2. An email  Much the same as above, only this time – it's digital. Words of thanks, appreciation or just a simple ‘keep up the great work’ can go a long way to making someone’s day.   3. Phone call or face-to-face greeting  For those comfortable with it (on both sides of the interaction), saying how a principal has made a difference over the phone or in person can be supremely rewarding. However, be mindful of the principal – they might be busy during the day, or not want to be disturbed during their free time. Use your discretion and knowledge of the person you want to thank!   4. A gift  Now, we don’t mean over-the-top gift baskets sent to the school in plain view of everyone – this could be just as mortifying as shouting from the rooftops. But if you have an existing relationship with the principal and know their tastes, sending them a gift can mean the world.   5. Be specific This is more generalised advice for the above. When you’re giving a principal a shout-out, don’t just say “for all the hard work you do”. Take the time to acknowledge something specific they have done – it might be a strategic initiative that’s worked wonders, innovative decisions in the school, or simply taking the time to go the extra mile for you or your children.  Shout-outs in the public arena  Many people thrive on public acknowledgement of their work. If you know a principal for whom this is the case, then International Women’s Day could be the perfect opportunity to give a shout-out in one of the following ways!   6. Social media posts  The Instagram shout-out is a tried and true way to acknowledge people on a social media forum, broadcasting your thanks and appreciation to all your followers.   You could also do it on your school’s Facebook page, tweet up a storm or go for an inspiring LinkedIn post. Tag them if it’s appropriate and shout out to your heart’s content!   7. Assemblies or meetings   Public appreciation in assembly can be an amazing thing. Thunderous applause, heartfelt thanks and a forum that brings it all back to why principals work so hard – the students. School assembly can be the perfect place for the perfect shout-out.  For something a little more informal, team (or board, or PTA) meetings are also a great setting for collective thanks and caring – consider the classic workplace morning tea!   8. News and newsletters  Most schools have a publication of some kind – and even if they don’t, there is always the local paper. Submit an opinion piece, or – if you’re feeling extravagant – even take out some ad space for a loud and proud thank you.   9. Public gift or gesture Remember above, where we suggested that some principals might not like getting a gift in public? This could be where it’s appropriate!   If you work with a principal who loves public acknowledgement, it’s time to get that hamper, bouquet or otherwise highly visible gift together. Who knows – maybe even a barbershop quartet to sing a song?   10. Being mindful with public shout-outs  While these gestures can be amazing to receive, it’s important to be very mindful of the recipient’s needs. Be thankful, be sincere – but try not to be intrusive if it’s going to have a negative impact!  Shout-outs: Wild cards  These gestures are the wild ones. The ones you might not immediately think of, but if they are appropriate (and executed well), can have magnificent results. As always – use your discretion!   11. Unfurl a gigantic banner  The principal’s face. A message of thanks. The lyrics to Tina Turner’s iconic ‘Simply the Best’. You can put whatever you like on a banner, and unfurl it at the right moment for maximum impact!   12. Create a flash mob  These aren’t everyone’s cup of tea, but can you imagine anything more adorable than an entire school coming together to perform a song and dance in honour of their principal?   An alternate and more up-to-date version of this is, of course, a TikTok.   13. Buy them some art  Finding a piece of art that reflects someone’s work and personality can be tricky. But if you’re confident in choosing the right piece, this can be a massive statement – and a lifelong gift.   Another way to say thanks with art is to work with the school’s students. Pieces created by the people the principals works so hard for can be some of the most meaningful gifts of all.   14. Send them away What better way to shout out someone in one of the busiest professions in the world than by giving them a break from it?   While principals may not have much free time, banding together to gift them a holiday when they do get time off could be just what they need.   15. Refer them to us!   You didn’t think we’d let the article slip by without mentioning our programmes, did you?   Year after year, principals tells us that the Strategic Leadership for Principals Programme is the best professional learning and development they have ever done. A free 10-month course that partners principals with business experts, it’s a vital piece of learning for any principal of any tenure.   If your principal hasn’t worked with us before, perhaps you want to give them the gift of knowledge – put them in touch with us!  
5 min read
Case Studies

Digital donations: How a volunteer supplied schools with laptops

What’s the best way to recycle a laptop?   E-waste collections, selling on TradeMe, gifting to a friend – there are many opportunities for passing on your tech when you upgrade to something new.   But for Whangarei-based Fonterra Area Manager Neil Crowson, the option was something a little different – donating laptops to schools in need.   Relationships and resources  In 2019, Neil was a Capacity Partner in Springboard Trust’s Strategic Leadership for Principals Programme (SLPP). Working with Okaihau Primary’s principal Tim Couling, they spent 10 months of the year working together to build Tim’s strategic leadership in a schooling context.   As the programme went on, conversations turned to issues specific to those rural and remote Northland schools. Issues like funding access, families’ digital resources, and improving the tech literacy of students in the regions.   “The tech space can be a big challenge, as Northland isn’t as well-resourced a region as some other parts of the country,” Neil notes.  “It meant that when the laptop situation arose, working with these schools was the organic and clear thing to do.” A timely donation delivery Towards the end of 2019, a refresh of Fonterra’s hardware presented Neil with a fantastic opportunity.   “We had 40 laptops that we wanted to recycle, and we suggested getting them out into schools instead.”   “During the last workshop and celebration with the SLPP group, I put it to the cohort – and it went down really well.”   From there, it was a simple case of logistics. Neil asked the principals to give him some direction on how to split the laptops, and together they decided to share the devices evenly between each school in the cohort.   Carol Ashton (one of Springboard’s Programme Managers in Northland) and Neil then delivered the laptops to the schools, and work was done – as simple as that!   “It was a pretty good feeling,” Neil adds, “especially at the end of the year – it feels great to be Santa Claus.”  “And on a professional level, it’s also nice to identify an opportunity and get those devices out. It’s having an impact in schools and communities who need it, without costing anyone anything.”  How the laptops impacted Northland schools Schools often operate on very fine margins – and while the gift of laptops may have been low effort and cost, Neil found the impact it has on the ground is profound.   “The comments from principals were that this will have a big impact, particularly for struggling families who don’t have access to or the means to buy these laptops. Kids had been sharing laptops, and with roll increases that scarcity would only grow worse.”   “It really filled the gap for low decile schools that needed more resources.”  Additionally, the laptop gifting has led to more projects outside the realm of the principals’ and Capacity Partners’ interactions during SLPP.   “I had conversations with some principals who suggested assigning the laptops to senior students at their school. From there, they could partner with people from Fonterra – bring that Springboard framework into the school and foster some great coaching sessions.”  While those conversations to set up the programme are ongoing, it is a testament to the power of connection that programmes like SLPP can develop.   “You have a 10-month programme with these principals, but the benefits are far longer-lasting.”   With six schools equipped with refurbished and recycled laptops and more work in the pipeline, Neil is thrilled with the way things have turned out – and what he’s learned in return.   “When you work as a Capacity Partner, there’s an impression that you’re teaching the principal – but it’s a two-way street.”  “I took a lot of learning out of my experience, things outside my industry that taught me new theories and ways of working. It’s a great thing to be a part of, and I can’t wait to come back for my third year!”  
4 min read
News

15 Questions with: Dale Bailey, Springboard Trust CEO

Welcome to 15 Questions! Each month, we will ask a different member of the Springboard Team or wider community about their work, heroes, education and secret hobbies. We hope you enjoy it! Dale Bailey: Springboard Trust CEO On February 24, Springboard Trust welcomes Dale Bailey as its new CEO. With a storied history across education, evaluation and GLAM (galleries, libraries, archives and museums), he brings a wealth of experience and insight to our work. To get ourselves (and you all) acquainted with Dale, we got his answers on hard-hitting questions about his hobbies and heroes. 1. Hello Dale! Where are you right now? I'm on the beach in the Coromandel, at Pauanui! My partner's sister has a beach house here, so I am taking a few days off before I start at Springboard. 2. What are you looking forward to most next week? Learning about Springboard – meeting the people, getting to know the team and understanding what drives you all. That’s the most important thing I think. 3. How did you first hear about Springboard Trust? I’ve got some friends who have intersected with SBT before. Some worked here, some have been on the corporate side of things and worked with the team.   They were very positive about Springboard and what it was doing and recommended it highly – which leads us here! 4. What's the most exciting thing about working at Springboard? Coming back to work in education. As a part of that, the idea of connecting the corporate world with education – it's pretty unique, that cross-fertilisation of ideas is really exciting.   5. And the most daunting?   I think it’s getting back into full time work after a few months off! And having such a distributed team across the country, getting to know them over a distance. I want to work quite hard at that.  6. Before Springboard, what was the most interesting thing you did for work?   That would have to be working at Te Papa, where I oversaw national collections. It was a pretty awesome responsibility, and one of the highlights was negotiating with the Chinese for the Terracotta Warrior exhibition to come to NZ. I got to travel to China six times, meet so many people and understand their systems a lot better. I loved it there, and loved working through how to create such a large scale exhibition.   7. Who is someone you look up to?  I am a great, long-time fan of Ernest Shackleton the Antarctic explorer.  8. Why?  He saved everybody in his party when it went to custard on an expedition, camping on ice and leading men on a 700 nautical mile journey through hurricane conditions to save them. The sense of personal leadership that he brings is so inspiring.  9. What's a piece of history you want more people to know about?   The Treaty of Waitangi. I have worked over the last year with the Waitangi Treaty Grounds, and am always surprised by how little people know about these complex relationships, and how amazing the treaty is as a modern guiding document.   10. Best piece of advice you've ever received?   One of my bosses once said “where you smell smoke, go towards the fire”.  Don’t try and ignore things, it's important to take them on.  11. How would you describe your leadership style?   Very collaborative and outcome focused. I like empowering people to get on with their job and making their job easier.   12. Favourite thing about NZ education?   The strength of public education in New Zealand. The fact that we have one of the world’s best systems, and that it started very early on in NZ’s history with a great level of investment in it, which has continued to this day – it’s a real standout strength.   13. What's your secret hobby?   I'm a great collector of Crown Lynn, usually through TradeMe and secondhand shops. Any time I travel, I’m looking out for more. I really like NZ-made things, and Crown Lynn is just incredible.   14. Favourite news source?   I am actually quite a fan of the Daily Mail online app – it's hysterical.   15. What is the question we should have asked you?  “Can you tell me about your grandsons?”  
3 min read

Infographic: Celebrate your local principal!

How To Shout Out Your Principal

Download our latest infographic, focusing on how to thoughtfully and sincerely say thank you to your local principal - initially for International Women's Day, but useful all year round!

Our Portfolio

What We Do

Improve your leadership Springboard Trust's unique learning programmes are designed to enable the development of outstanding educational leaders who dramatically improve their schools and wider communities.   To achieve this, we offer a range of programmes and services that provide multi-year support for leaders. Over these years, principals partner with us on a journey to:  Learn or enhance their strategic leadership skills.   Connect with cross-sector partners for unique leadership insights.  Develop the tools and skills necessary to plan and report to boards and other stakeholders.  Build leadership capability throughout a school.   Map the impacts of strong leadership right down to student outcomes.   Network with other schools and sectors to improve the community.   Principals do not generally undertake every programme and service that Springboard offers. By partnering with Springboard and selecting programmes and services that are tailored to your needs, you broaden your skill set and bring yourself – and your leadership team – on a journey that alumni call "the best professional development you will ever get".   The Principal's Journey   Every Principal's journey begins with the Strategic Leadership for Principals Programme (SLPP). After this point, your programme manager will work with you to understand your challenges and opportunities, and support you to select the best programme or service for your needs.Entry Programmes Strategic Leadership for Principals Programme (SLPP) A one-year, nine-workshop programme that sees principals partner with a business sector volunteer to develop strategic thinking and leadership. The foundational building block of strong educational leaders.  Strategic Leadership for Rural Teaching Principals (SLRTP) A full-year programme, focused on the challenges faced by teaching principals in rural New Zealand communities. (Pilot phase - limited entry). Alumni Services After completing SLPP or SLRTP, principals become Springboard Trust alumni. At this point, they can take part in a number of highly tailored programmes, workshops and services to deepen their strategic leadership and build the capabilities of their team. High Performing Leaders A one-term service for alumni principals or your senior and middle leaders, focusing on building self awareness through 360 degree feedback and support from a coach.  High Performing Leadership Teams A one-term programme for alumni principals and their leadership teams, learning the essentials of group dynamics, shared goals and commitment. Kickstart Your Strategy Workshop A one-day workshop in which principals and your leadership teams are provided with tools and to put your strategic plan into action on a day-to-day basis.   Talent Management Workshop A one-day workshop focused on ensuring that you have the right people in the right place at the right time to deliver your strategic plan. Annual Planning Workshop A one-day workshop for principals and your leadership teams, focused on building initiatives, actions and goals for the coming year.   Learning Events Annual, half or full-day networking events that give principals and your lead teams the opportunity to hear from the best and brightest speakers, from both in and out of the education sector.   School Innovation Services A bespoke service, based around initiatives that schools require specialist support to scope and implement.  Beyond these set programmes and workshops, the beauty of the Springboard Trust model is its flexibility. By partnering principals with cross-sector experts based on your needs, we are able to facilitate solutions for a whole host of issues, including:  Project Management  Coaching and people management  Change management  Digital transformation  Communication plans  Strategy refresh  Parent and whānau engagement  Select a programme above – or head to our contact page to enquire about how else we might be able to help.

Our Portfolio

Strategic Leadership for Principals Programme (SLPP)

A free 10-month development programme for New Zealand principals. The Strategic Leadership for Principals Programme (SLPP) brings New Zealand principals together with strategic experts to develop your leadership and support clear, insightful planning for our schools - free of charge. Strategic leadership is a pivotal element for improved school performance. The ability to plan, manage and report as the fulcrum of your community ensures healthy relationships and the right conditions for everyone to thrive.   But too often, school leaders lack the time, knowledge or resources to learn strategic planning and put it into action.   How does SLPP work?   1. Expression of interest  We can’t help you develop your leadership if we don’t know you’re there! All New Zealand principals are welcome to participate in the Strategic Leadership for Principals Programme. You can get in touch with us here, and one of our Programme Managers will get back to you on availability for our next set of cohorts.   Our Programme Managers are some of the most experienced members of the Springboard Team and will be on hand to guide you through the SLPP journey, answering any and all questions you have. They’ll also be your main point of contact for post-SLPP programmes and services!   Please note that our journeys begin in Term One of each year, so getting in touch with us by the end of Term Two the year before is a good idea.   While we aim to give everyone an opportunity to take part in SLPP, our resourcing only allows for limited places, with schools in greatest need of our assistance given priority.   For volunteers interested in SLPP, please see our Volunteer Support page.   2. Finding your partner   In SLPP, you work extensively with a Capacity Partner – a volunteer from the business world who brings knowledge, trust and curiosity to the relationship.   Having run nearly 100 cohorts in the last decade, the Springboard Team is adept at finding people who work well together.   3. The workshops begin   Over 10 months, you and your Capacity Partner will meet as part of a ‘cohort’, with five to six other principal-capacity partner pairings and one volunteer facilitator (also from one of our major or strategic partners).   This peer-to-peer, cross-sector work means you get insight and understanding of strategic leadership that often isn’t possible on your own.   As a cohort, your progress through nine workshops, each focused on a core element of strategic planning.   4. Present and Celebrate  The final workshop is more of a celebration and reflection. You and the other principals in your cohort will present your strategic plans to everyone, before celebrating the progress you’ve made together alongside your partners and the Springboard Team.   While this ends the formal meetings of your group, many of our cohorts stick together long after the SLPP is complete – meeting quarterly, sharing advice on their strategic plans and continuously evolving their leadership skills.   Most principals who have completed SLPP will also want to continue their leadership development – for example, sharpening their annual planning skills or involving their leadership team in the same professional development. This is where our Alumni Services begin.   Why take on SLPP?   At Springboard, we believe we’re better together. By sharing tools, frameworks and expertise across sectors, principals and business leaders develop much greater understanding of each others’ roles and the common challenges and opportunities that they face as leaders.   This is reflected in New Zealand Council of Educational Research (NZCER) reporting we commissioned on the impacts of SLPP. Some 93 per cent of principals said this programme had a high or medium impact on their leadership.   In turn, this has a positive impact on leadership teams, teachers, and student opportunities.   What comes after SLPP?   The Strategic Leadership for Principals Programme is the first step on your development journey with Springboard Trust. Once you understand and apply strategic planning tools and frameworks yourself, it’s time to move on to areas like implementation, community engagement and distributing leadership across your teams.  Typically, we recommend the Kickstart Your Strategy workshop as an excellent follow-up to SLPP in Term One the following year. However, alumni principals (those who have completed SLPP) are able to pursue any of the programmes and services we offer.   To find our more about SLPP or join our next cohort, click here.  

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High Performing Leadership Teams (HPLT)

It takes a village to raise a strong school environment.  While strong leadership is a must for any New Zealand principal, it is equally important to bring that journey to each and every member of a school’s leadership team.   Springboard Trust’s High Performing Leadership Teams programme helps schools develop a shared vision, understanding and plan for high performance. It helps individuals find their place in a leadership team, create development pathways and identify how every members of a team contributes to the vision or plan of a school.   A problem shared is a problem halved, and leadership shared is leadership gained by all.   How does High Performing Leadership Teams work?   HPLT is a programme designed to light the fire of distributed leadership in New Zealand schools.   You and your leadership team (both senior and middle leaders welcome) meet with two expert volunteer facilitators through four workshops, taking place across one school term, all under the guidance of a Springboard Trust Programme Manager.   A pre-survey helps the facilitators understand your team, and they will feed back analysis on how you all work together before the workshops begin. This ensures the course is tailored to your leadership team’s needs, rather than a prescribed curriculum that may not be an ideal fit.   The four workshops are: Building a cohesive team; Understanding team dynamics and viewpoints; Operating an effective team, and Strategic leadership in action.  Through the workshops, you will build a cohesive team unit who understand one another, learn to operate effectively and communicate with one another to improve learner success.   A final round of analysis with the facilitators helps your team set next steps, and clearly define roles and development for the future.   What do school leaders gain from High Performing Leadership Teams?  By the end of an HPLT course, you and your leadership team should be able to:   Give and receive open and honest feedback in a trusting environment.   Operate as a strong team (good time management, delegation and facilitation of meetings). Identify how each individual fits into a long-term strategic plan.   Understand why you work together; what the common goal of your group is and how you contribute to it.   Use and apply tools to improve everyone's development immediately.   Distribute leadership, improving everyone’s strategic thinking.   Who is High Performing Leadership Teams for?   HPLT is open to the leadership teams surrounding all Springboard Trust alumni (those who have completed the Strategic Leadership for Principals Programme).   While all leadership team members are welcome, it is ultimately the decision of the principal on who to bring to the HPLT programme. In particular, leadership team members who play an important role in the implementation of your strategic plan should be invited.   What do you need for High Performing Leadership Teams?   First and foremost, a willing leadership team that wants to commit to positive change and a better shared understanding of your work. The HPLT programme will take up to five days of time across a single school term, ideally conducted face to face in a safe environment. Please note that unlike many of our other strategic leadership programmes, HPLT does have a cost of $2,500 plus GST. There are scholarships available thanks to our partners – please contact us to find out more about this.   To enquire about our next HPLT intake, please either contact your Programme Manager or head on over to our contact page.  

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Students impacted
138,487

Over 150 participating schools across New Zealand

From strategic leadership to educational transformation, our programmes impact schools and learners right across the country.

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